In Loving Memory of Denise Semands Suttles

Heritage Hills

Historic Homes Tour

2021

October 23rd & 24th, Noon to 5:00pm

2021 Featured Homes

Advance ticket prices for this year’s Home Tour are $18.00. Children under 12 will receive free admission to the Tour. Tickets the weekend of the Tour will be $20.00 per person. Will call tickets can be picked up at any of the Tour Home Ticket Tables or at the Tent on the Henry & Anna Overholser Mansion lawn.

COVID POLICY: Attendance at the 2021 Heritage Hills Historic Homes Tour requires proof of full vaccination. Masks are required inside Tour homes. All staff, volunteers, and ticket holders attending the event, will be required to present proof of a full covid vaccination, with final dose at least 14 days prior to attendance. All children between 2-12 years of age will be required to wear a mask. Ticket takers and will-call staff will be checking vax cards and photo identification prior to issuing a ticket.

The Suttles Home

327 NW 14th Street

This distinctive home was built in 1911 for Missouri native Samuel M. Gloyd and his wife, Elizabeth. It was sold to Samuel W. Hayes in 1927.  Hayes was elected a delegate to the Oklahoma Constitutional Convention, became a member of the first Oklahoma Supreme Court and served terms as State Chairman and Regent of Oklahoma University. The Hayes family owned the home for 32 years.   

The home sat vacant for a number of years and was purchased at a sheriff’s auction in 1981 by Richard Geren and Bryan Watts who allowed the Oklahoma City Symphony Orchestra Women’s Committee to use the home as the Decorator’s Show House.

Approaching this home, one is immediately struck by the red brick and decorative stone trim creating strong horizontal lines patterned after the revolutionary architectural creations of Frank Lloyd Wright.   One also notices the extravagant use of exposed over-scaled decorative rafter tails on both the first and the second stories, as well as flying corbels.  Other distinguishing features include the red tile roof, bronze medallions, and strong wall-end chimneys.  

As you enter the main portal of this residence, please notice the original “Arts and Crafts” glass in the front door (repaired after damage caused from the Murrow Building bombing) and the stained-glass porch light.  

Ron and Denise Suttles purchased the home in 2014.  This is not their first home in Heritage Hills.  They have strong feelings about living in an historic home.  Their sense of stewardship and a “caretaker mentality’ have led them to be exemplary Heritage Hills citizens and legacy homeowners.

The Irwin Home

601 NW 14th Street

This impressive and beautiful home was once the home of Frank and Merle Buttram. Built between 1908 and 1909, the architectural style is an adaption of Mission, one of the Colonial Revival variations sweeping the nation.  One enters this home through an arcaded ramada with a fanciful curved cornice, beveled windows on the door and the honeycomb mullions on the transom.  Other architectural elements include red tiles on the roof, stucco finish, and curvilinear gables.  Less typical features include exposed rafter tails, a hipped roof and three sleeping porches. A porte-cochere on the west side of the house completes the exterior architecture.

The visitor will notice the varied style of mullions on the house that also create visual interest and further uniqueness.  For example, on the second floor of the structure, the mullions are arranged in a “Ladder” pattern while the lower windows are arranged in the typical Arts and Crafts style.  Included are also honeycomb patterned windows on the east side and on the front transom.  Also exhibited are “ribbon mullions” on the upstairs windows.  These are the original windows that the owners have had totally and beautifully restored.

Once in the home, one encounters newly installed gleaming black and white marble floors.  Tiger oak paneling and ceiling beams that were once finished in a dark finish have been lacquered shiny white giving the entire first floor a new, light and glamorous appearance.  Notice the beautiful “Juliette” balcony on the landing between the first and second floor.  The sleek new kitchen is comprised of a former Breakfast Room, Kitchen, Pantry and Mud Room.   

The Second Floor has undergone a complete rearrangement of rooms to incorporate a Laundry Room, Master Walk-in Closets among other changes.  The Carriage House was completely restored during the addition of the swimming pool for use as a Pool House/Cabana/Side-entry Garage.

Jimmy and Jackie Irwin purchased this home in October, 2016.  They took up residence in March of 2018.

The Carey Home

326 NW 16th Street

Mr. and Mrs. Carey have created a home that is truly a remarkable example of a legacy home that has been well cared for and beautifully and faithfully restored.  This 1929 home is a masterpiece of Moorish design. It was built for Mr. and Mrs. Adalbert Brown by the well-known contractor, Ray Smizer.

The exterior of this residence is embellished with arches, balconets, sculpted window heads, turned columns, recessed entryway, and multi-colored roof tiles.  The interior of the home is just as unique, with a twenty-foot ceiling and hand-painted beams in the living room, an oversized crystal chandelier in the dining room and a wood paneled study.  Typical of the Moorish design, the floor plan is open, with easy access from room to room and from inside to outside.

The home was purchased in 1938 by Charles A. Vose, Chairman of the Board of First National Bank in Oklahoma City.  He served on the bank’s Board of Directors until he was in his eighties and built First National into the largest bank in Oklahoma.

In 1985, William V. Carey, Jr. purchased the home.  Extensive repairs were accomplished, including updating the mechanical systems, converting the lanai to a den, remodeling the kitchen, and rehabilitating the dining room chandelier.  Today, the home looks much as it did in 1929.

The Leydorf Home

319 NW 19th Street

The handsome stately home was built by Nichols and Chandler in 1917. The broad horizontal lines of the home are typical of Frank Lloyd Wright’s “Prairie” emphasis, which was both popular and practical in its design. There are extended eaves over the banks of windows which allow for ample light to enter the interior spaces.  The home’s strong horizontal lines are visually anchored to the landscape by massive brick “keyhole” columns. Decorative iron work crowns the porch to complete the elegant façade of this structure. 

Upon completion, this four bedroom, three full baths and two half baths home was sold to Frederick Finerty who, with his brother Roy, built a chain of banks across Oklahoma. Their crowning success was the reorganization of the First State Bank of Oklahoma City to charter Fidelity National Bank. 

After Finnerty’s ’s death, the home was purchased by Mr. and Mrs. J. Franklin Harbo, who established the nationally famous Harbour Longmire Furniture Company. 

The house has recently undergone a complete renovation including the addition of a powder room, atrium doors opening to a new deck, and a cloak closet adjacent to the front door.

Mr. and Mrs. Leydorf and their two sons moved into the house in March of 2020. Their decision to make Heritage Hills their home was motivated by a true neighborhood feeling.  They are truly a welcome addition to the Heritage Hills family. 

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